Skipper butterfly on Aster bloom

17 09 2019

Nikon D850, Nikkor 105mm micro

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Skipper on Asters

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Eastern tiger swallowtail on Vervain

10 09 2019

Nikon D850, Nikkor 105mm micro lens, 1/250 sec, f/13, ISO 400

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Tiger Swallowtail on purple WEB





Stack ‘o butterflies

10 09 2019

I think the top and bottom ones might be Clouded Sulphurs, middle one is a Variegated Fritillary; feasting on Purple coneflowers (with purple Lantana in the background)

Nikon D850, Nikkor 105mm micro lens, 1/250 sec, f/14, ISO 400

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Stacked Butterflies WEB





Featured on Shutterbug online!

10 07 2019

Last summer I was contacted by an editor I work with through Nikon and also Shutterbug magazine. He wanted to run a photo and behind-the-shot story of one of my images in the July 2018 issue of the magazine. Then one month before its debut, the print version of the magazine folded (in other words, Shutterbug was shuttered!). This would have been the second time my work would have appeared in the print publication (the first time was when my fern stamps were featured). Last week I got an email asking if they could run it online and I said of course! So here’s the image and the behind-the-shot story. Special thanks to my friend Sherry Goldstein (the woman who pointed this beautiful critter out to me). Click on the link below to go to the post!

https://www.shutterbug.com/content/always-carry-your-camera-how-botanical-photographer-captured-beautiful-butterfly-image?fbclid=IwAR2JI7E7VTu3Ml9d3-QkTFQIHAUEGKwjWKdvMxJiwiCZcvrYjsLzaQMVJ9U

Screen Shot 2019-07-10 at 6.40.11 PM.png





Skipper butterfly on chive bloom

26 05 2018

Nikon D850, Nikkor 105mm micro

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.


WEB Skipper on Chives





Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

6 08 2017

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Eastern Tiger





Skipper on ‘Sombrero Adobe Orange’ coneflower

12 07 2017

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Skipper Coneflower Side.jpg





Skipper on Purple coneflower

12 07 2017

Skipper on Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved

WEB Skipper on Coneflower





Tiger on a tiger: Eastern Tiger swallowtail on Tiger lily

12 07 2017

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Tiger on Tiger

WEB Tiger Lily 1





Buffet line: Skippers on Purple coneflower

12 07 2017

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Two Skippers





Skipper butterfly

12 07 2017

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Skipper butterfly on Verbena bonariensis (also called Vervain)

WEB Skipper Purple Flower





Monarch on zinnia

1 06 2015

Just uncovered this never-before-shared gem from my archives—overlooked in the cull of hundreds of butterfly images from the Wings of Fancy exhibit at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, MD a few years ago.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

MonarchLightPinkZinnia





Re-post: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Zinnie ‘Zowie’

14 01 2015

Temps have been in the 30s and 40s here in (usually sunny) Texas, with murky gray skies almost every day. I’m in need of some color!

Originally posted July 27, 2010

Overcast and very pleasant day, perfect for a quick (and fruitful) lunchtime shoot at Green Spring Gardens. This is an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on a ‘Zowie’ Zinnia.

Note: I was actually trying to get a shot (with the tripod in place) of just the two Zinnias when the Swallowtail landed on one of the flowers. I held my breath and got just two shots before it flew off. I live for moments (and wild color) like this!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





The Monarch butterfly has been here since the time of dinosaurs

1 11 2013

Screen shot 2013-11-01 at 7.20.43 AMIt was a discovery to see a 50 million year old butterfly fossil at the National Natural History Museum in Washington, D.C., earlier this month. With the fossil, it is now possible to prove that winged pollinators have been here throughout history.

It is a calamity that the Monarch Butterfly only has a five percent survival rate in 2013. I had the honor of hearing Rick Beaver speak about butterflies. He reiterated that it is the children that need to learn and honor nature. I feel certain that Alderville First Nation children, Ontario, Canada, are learning about butterflies and other pollinators.

How could present day mankind be part of destroying a world that once was pristine? Nature was a gift to mankind. We need to live within and be connected to nature. When we make ourselves a separate species far removed from nature, an indicator species such as Monarch Butterfly becomes an endangered biological migration.

The Monarch is telling us that something is wrong in the environment; we most avert a colossal loss of species in our lifetime. Support sustainability at your home, apartment, townhouse, duplex, housing development, and backyards. This is a step that each of us can take to preserve a beautiful planet filled with butterfles. Let’s pass Creation onto the next generation.





Summer Azure butterfly on Black-eyed Susan

30 07 2013

Summer Azure butterfly (Celastrina neglecta) on Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta); photographed at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WhiteButterflyRudbeckia





Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Orange Tiger Lily

30 07 2013

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus) on Orange Tiger Lily (Tigrinum Splendens), photographed at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

EasternTIgeronTIgerLily





Silver-spotted skipper

30 07 2013

Silver-spotted skipper (Epargyreus clarus) on chives (I think it is chives); photographed at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

SilverSpottedSkipper





Rusty-tipped Page on Mountain Mint

27 07 2013

Rusty-tipped Page (Siproeta epaphus), also know as the Brown Siproeta, on Mountain Mint (Pycnanthemum incanum); photographed at the Wings of Fancy exhibit at Brookside Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Brown Tip





Swallowtail butterfly (species unknown)

26 07 2013

Photographed at the Wings of Fancy exhibit at Brookside Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Butterfly 1

 





Malachite butterfly

26 07 2013

Malachite butterfly (Siproeta stelenes), a neotropical brush-footed butterfly, photographed at Brookside Gardens in their Wings of Fancy exhibit

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Malachite Butterfly lorez





Want a free photography lesson on photographing flowers and gardens?

18 07 2013

Read my feature, “Garden Photography,” in the summer issue of Celebrate Home Magazine. I share tips on shooting, what’s in my bag, notes on specific photos to teach about composition and light, and my favorite resources and websites. The issue will also be available for purchase through magcloud.com (at cost + shipping; see link below) on our website, www.celebratehomemagazine.com soon.

View the issue as reader spreads (my favorite!):

CHM Summer 2013 Spreads

View the issue as single pages (suitable for printing):

CHM Summer 2013 Single Pages

Splurge and purchase a beautiful print copy on magcloud.com (no markup; at cost + shipping):

http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/600404

Help us spread the word! Share Celebrate Home Magazine with your family and friends.

Photography and design by Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

CHM Garden Photo





Re-post: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on ‘Zowie’ Zinnia

14 07 2013

Originally posted July 27, 2010

Overcast and very pleasant day, perfect for a quick (and fruitful) lunchtime shoot at Green Spring Gardens. This is an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on a ‘Zowie’ Zinnia.

Note: I was actually trying to get a shot (with the tripod in place) of just the two Zinnias when the Swallowtail landed on one of the flowers. I held my breath and got just two shots before it flew off. I live for moments (and wild color) like this!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Same time, last year re-post: Mating Monarchs

14 07 2013

Photographed at Brookside Gardens’ Wings of Fancy exhibit; the blue/purple blobs in the background are Plumbago flowers

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Garden phlox

9 05 2013

Perennial or Garden phlox (Phlox paniculata); attracts butterflies and hummingbirds; this fragrant flower was photographed at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

White Flowers Phlox?





Skippers on Celosia

21 08 2012

Skipper butterflies on Celosia (Cockscomb) flowers at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





22 things I have learned while preparing for my photography exhibit

21 02 2012

Someone once said, “it takes a village to produce a photography exhibit,” (or something to that effect). It’s true, and I will thank as many people possible in this posting. I know there will be more thank you’s to come in future postings, so if I’ve missed naming you, please forgive me.

1) Be careful what you wish for. Oh, and thanks (both heartfelt and sarcastically) to dear friend, Jeff Evans, for suggesting I hop on the photo exhibit bandwagon with him.

2) Every image that ultimately gets vetoed, even after trying to assess it with a critical eye 87 times, feels like I’m abandoning a child (that I don’t have). I’m down to this: does this image make me immediately say, “ohhhhh, yes. You are good.” Or does it elicit a “meh” or “Really? A point and shooter coulda shot that” at first glance?

3) Acid-free framing tape makes an excellent bandage around a wedge of Bounty paper towel when you stub your big toe on that piece of unusable glass you forgot was there.

4) Don’t try to continue framing when you get a paper cut. It’s not pretty. And no, an eraser won’t help.

5) Even the nicest frames can come with crappy glass. If there’s a scratch on my brand new glass, can I assume someone took a diamond ring and ran it across the surface? I thought the only thing that could scratch glass was a diamond.

6) And while we’re on the subject of frames…when you need 20 larger frames and the best price online for a particular frame is one that has acrylic/Plexiglas instead of actual glass (cheaper and safer to ship, I’ve learned), this is still not the way to go—no matter what you read on the forums by all those exhibit know-it-alls when you Google, “glass vs. Plexiglas for a photography exhibit.” When you get the frame in, you will peel off the protective cover on both sides of the flimsy sheet and every speck of dust in Bexar County, Texas will find its way to you. No amount of compressed air will alleviate the problem. When you use that baby soft dust brush to lightly remove the dust, it will make permanent scratches on the surface. You will then spend an hour on the phone researching the cheapest place in San Antonio to have glass cut in 18×24 sheets. Sigh, another purchase? (See #12)

7) Converting one’s craft room to a frame shop makes it irresistible to a cat. ZenaB, our tuxedo cat, has this thing for licking plastic (bags and the like). Every frame I unwrap is covered in acres of shrink wrap or a plastic envelope. Seriously, she needs an intervention.

8) Speaking of cats, did you know that the sound of compressed air will send a cat back upstairs in two seconds flat?

9) When one is so pinned in by empty frames, backer boards, acid-free foam core, prints of various sizes, mats, good glass and diamond-scratched glass, glazier gun and points, tape, scissors, xacto knives, rulers and framing wire that one can’t get up to change the radio station when a song one really hates comes on or one debates whether one should go pee or just hold it in a little longer, one should question one’s sanity. All that is missing is that adorable and extremely patient Matt Paxton, extreme cleaning expert from Hoarders, coming around the corner and chuckling nervously as he assesses the mission and asks “can this woman/house be saved?” Excuse me while I diverge…a few months ago I saw a magazine cover (some pricey creative/artsy/craftsy publication whose name escapes me) and the main headline read, “Are you a horder?” Who is proofreading this thing?

10) And speaking of purchases…buy everything you need online, from coated framing wire to hooks to mats and foam core boards (even cut to exact specs!). It will be considerably cheaper, even after you add shipping costs, than getting it locally at a craft store or frame shop. This was a valuable lesson at the outset.

11) Every time I enter my temporary “frame shop,” I hear that “thrinkkkkkk” sound from Hoarders—the one that sounds right before they type something like “Cindy, Alexandria, Virginia” on the screen. Ditto when I step into the living room, where all the finished frames are awaiting transport to the venue next Monday. Will my house ever be back to normal?

12) My bank account may never truly recover. Ever. So if you do come to the show, have pity—buy something. Or two somethings. And really, an odd number is better for a whole host of reasons, so make it three somethings. I promise to apply a quantity discount.

13) You would be surprised at how guerilla-marketing-ish you’ll get when you’re parting with this much time and money in preparation for an exhibit (not to mention you haven’t had an exhibition of your work since the covered wagon days). I have e-mailed people that I haven’t talked to in years in an effort to promote the show. If I could find my kindergarten teacher, I would mail her a postcard, too. To what end, I have no idea. It is something I feel compelled to do. What if I leave her out? She might know someone who knows someone who knows someone who publishes a magazine about flowers and they are in dyer dire need of fresh images.

14) Note to self: A Flower fly does not a Honey bee make. Surely you knew that when you signed that print, matted it, framed it, sealed the back and added the framing wire and hooks. Your heart really wasn’t in it when you came up with that lame title, “Busy Bee,” anyway. Maybe it’s because it’s not a bee in the first place. You know the difference. Were you inhaling compressed air? There’s one do-over to add to the queue. Muchas gracias to my younger sister, Kelley, for her very keen eye in helping me cull the first round of images and for suggesting (and assisting in) naming the images. You really have do an eye for this, Wap-Wap! Wanna represent me? Thanks to my high school buddy James Williams and his wife Irma and daughter Elise for being the first to preview the show (or what I had finished preparing at that point), spread out all over the King’s living room (the prints, not the Williams family).

15) When you get notice that the XYZ Chrysanthemum Society is taking orders for mum plants via e-mail (and you joined the group who knows why at that plant sale years ago), don’t e-mail the entire list back to (very politely) ask if anyone knows what hybrid a particular mum is in the attached photo. More than two dozen people received my question and not one responded. I thought gardeners were more open than that. Seriously, not one. The lesson in this sad tale is to never assume just because you’re excited about your show that total strangers want to make sure you get your IDs correct. They’re too busy growing mums to bother with your little project.

16) But on the identification flip-side, your fellow bloggers and rabid gardeners will respond within minutes on your Facebook wall when you attach a photo and beg for help labeling the flower. Thanks in particular to fellow blogger and garden designer Pam Pennick and Bobbie Hill Evans for identifying my Autumn sage (Salvia greggii), but also to Mahvelous Mahvin, Jimmie, Patricia, Sean and Anna, for chiming in on the “pretty flower.”

17) Ditto on the spider identification, too. Bug people are busy people, apparently. Why don’t you look it up in one of your umpteen spider books, Cindy? What are ya—lazy? Deep in my heart, I knew it was a sort of crab spider, but I wanted absolute confirmation of which crab spider it was. Didn’t get it. My mind flashed to this very possible scenario: A local entomologist is on his lunch break one balmy April day at Green Spring Gardens. After finishing lunch, he wanders into the Horticulture Center. “Oh, look, a new exhibit,” he thinks to himself. He wanders down the ramp, admiring each image (drawn in particular to the ones with insects, of course), until he comes to the image titled Bird’s Eye View. “Hmmm…let’s see…what an interesting perspective.” He leans forward to read the accompanying sign. “Crab spider on Chrysanthemum. Hmmm…girl should really have consulted a bug expert. That is most certainly not a Crab spider. Sheesh.” (Oh, and a note to that hypothetical entomologist—if you’re reading this, take this into consideration. I really did try to get my ID correct. Don’t you judge me.)

18) Despite the long (but happy) hours I’ve spent preparing for this exhibit, I’ve discovered that framing my images—with all the little details that go into it from start to finish—is very zen for me. Extreme thanks to my father, aka The King of Texas, for showing me how to do all of this by my lonesome self—and for letting me thoroughly deplete his ample (and expensive) supply of acid-free foam core board. (His framing shed, er, castle, is like being in a craft shop. The supplies never ran out!) The King (shown at left) is a major sponsor of this exhibit—so a grateful tip of this peasant’s bedraggled hat to his Royal Highness. When I’m framing, every image conjures up when, where and how I created it and that feeling I had knowing I got the best shot possible. However, I’m well aware that meditation is a far cheaper endeavor. Of course, I needed another hobby. 🙂

19) Friends, family and complete strangers who learn of the show will become your ultimate cheerleaders. You were already excited about the venue, the opportunity to do the show, seeing your work actually printed and framed (and not just contained within the boundaries of a computer screen on a blog) and the myriad possibilities that might accompany such an event—but your fans and supporters will only bolster that feeling with their feedback. They will spread the word, pass along your invite, and suggest other advertising outlets. Friends from far away will start making flight reservations just to come to see your little show.

20) The show will consume your life at every turn. When you are not designing something to make money to actually pay for the show, you will be matting, framing, taping, typing, primping, scheming, researching, identifying, begging for identification, labeling and stamping postcards and opening box after box after box of supplies delivered to you via FedEx, UPS and the postman. Your multiple purchases will bolster the faltering economy and provide an endless stream of oversized boxes that will amuse and delight your cats (except for that one time when you tossed the two kittens into the box filled with water-soluble-eco-friendly packing peanuts and completely freaked them out). You will skip dinner because you lose track of time. Your cats will (almost) skip dinner because you lose track of time. You will actually go through the motions of framing in your sleep and be a tad disappointed when you realize that those weren’t really done when you awaken the next day. Your husband will help you haul 600 pounds of frames to and from the car and try not to fall asleep when you recite your plans out loud. He will also feed you when you’re too preoccupied to do it yourself (thank you, sweetie). Your lovely long-time friend, Cam, will offer to fly up from Florida to help you hang the show and you will be floored by her generosity and sentiment and will anxiously await her arrival, input, feedback, honesty and company. Your redheaded friend Karen will not sigh or roll her eyes when you prattle incessantly about your show preparations over IHOP breakfast-for-dinner on girl’s night out. Your other friend Karen (she of the not-red-head) will help you with pricing your offerings and tablescaping the reception. Special thanks to one cheerleader in particular, Barbara Kelley (shown above). The Sneeze Guard Heiress will be catering my reception on April 15. Check out her latest culinary creation on her hospitality blog here.

21) It really does help to have a strong graphic design background when you prepare for something like this. All of your marketing materials will look polished and you won’t have to pay someone else to design them. This will be the only place where you and your money will not be parted.

When you log online just to order the postcards to promote your exhibit, you will begin to imagine your photos on mousepads, key chains, hoodies, lawn signs, bumper stickers, tote bags, greeting cards, magnetic car signs, luggage tags, banners and posters. The online company will even suggest every single one of these items all the way up to checking out. You will be tempted. Step away from vistaprint.com, sistah. Thank you to my college roommate and fellow graphic designer (shown at left), Sonya Mendeke, for designing my beautiful Garden Muse website dedicated solely to this show.

22) Remind me again why I’m doing this?

Ah, yes, to free these images from the confines of my blog and my external hard drives:





The beauty of pollination

15 02 2012

Thanks to my friend Jeff for sending this amazing video to me!





Eye candy, batch #4

14 12 2011

Sigh…culling through my archives, in preparation for my March/April 2012 exhibit, is making me want to photograph blooms and bugs right now.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Eye candy, batch #2

11 12 2011

Pulled from the archives of my personal refrigerator magnet poetry, I give to you my handcrafted attempt #1:

January snow blanket melts
cold February moon gone
March winds a memory
a luscious light envelopes
tiny crocus petals whisper spring
most delicate green grass emerges
rain sweetens the earth
bird song filters down
from the impossibly blue blue sky
warm breezes weave through
a gorgeous tapestry of color

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Monarch Butterfly on Egyptian Star Flowers

17 10 2011

Egyptian Star Flower (Pentas lanceolata) is a fall-blooming herbaceous perennial that is treated as an annual in my Zone 7 area. The cluster of buds open into small (1/2 inch at most) star-shaped flowers that are irresistible to butterflies and bees. Photographed at Green Spring Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Chrysanthemums

16 10 2011

I believe this is a Chrysanthemum x grandiflorum ‘Hillside Pink Sheffield’ variety of garden mum. There wasn’t a label on the plants at Green Spring Gardens, but my research took me to Monrovia’s site and these flowers look much like the ones shown here. The blooms attracted a bounty of honeybees as well as many butterflies, including Fiery Skippers (Hylephila phyleus), Common Buckeyes (Junonia coenia), Cabbage Whites (Pieris rapae) and Monarchs (Danaus plexippus). I didn’t get too many shots of the insects due to both the windy conditions and their way-too-quick movement!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Hide ’n Seek

31 08 2011

Photographed at the Monarch Butterfly Habitat in Shell Lake, Wisconsin

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Agastache

31 08 2011

Agastache bloom photographed against a backdrop of native prairie grasses at the Monarch Butterfly Habitat in Shell Lake, Wisconsin, 8.25.2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Monarch Butterfly

31 08 2011

Monarch Butterfly on Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa), photographed in the Demonstration Garden at the Spooner Agricultural Research Station, part of the College of Agricultural & Life Sciences at UW-Madison. One section is an official All-America Selections Display Garden, one of only seven sites found in Wisconsin. The Demonstration Garden showcases plants that are suitable for growing in zone 3 and is a joint effort between the Research Station, the University of Wisconsin Cooperative Extension Service and area UW-Extension Master Gardener volunteers.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Same time, last year: Skipper butterfly on White Ginger Lily

18 08 2011

Unidentified type of Skipper butterfly on the very fragrant White Ginger Lily (Hedychium coronarium), photographed at the Atlanta Botanical Garden

UPDATE 8.19.2011: Thanks to Harlan Ratcliff from The Roused Bear blog for identifying this butterfly as a Fiery Skipper!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Not too shabby for a point-n-shoot, huh?

10 08 2011

Yesterday Michael and I took our guests out for their first vineyard/wine tasting experience and to see the Blue Ridge Mountains. Since I don’t drink, I wandered around the three different vineyards looking for things to photograph with my “baby camera,” the Nikon Coolpix L110. It has macro capabilities and this is really the first time I’ve used that feature since I bought it last year. I like to carry a small point-n-shoot in my purse at all times, and this is my fourth one—and by far my favorite. The Nikon Coolpix L110 has 12.1 megapixels, 15x optical zoom-Nikkor glass lens, 3 inch display, VR image stabilization, motion detection, 720p HD video recording with stereo sound, and can shoot up to 6400 ISO. The macro function gets you as close as 0.4 inches!

While Michael, Sean and Anna tasted wines, I stalked this Great Spangled Fritillary (Speryeria cybele) on the patio at Gadino Cellars in Rappahannock County, VA. The critter was quite focused on the task at hand, so I was able to get several decent shots using the macro function (and without a tripod, I still got a sharp image). I also recorded a short video of it with the camera (it won’t win any documentary awards, unfortunately), but it does show that with this little camera you get quite a lot of bang for your buck (under $300). I recommend it if you’re looking for something small that also has video capability—and the macro feature is pretty amazing, too!

UPDATE: My Hearing Loss Magazine editor, Barbara Kelley, was looking for a point-n-shoot recommendation and says the Nikon Coolpix L110 has been discontinued and is now replaced by the L120, which is 14.1 megapixels and has a longer zoom (21x). It’s available for about the same price ($279 at Target and on amazon.com).

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Same time, last year: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on ‘Zowie’ Zinnia

27 07 2011

Originally posted July 27, 2010

Overcast and very pleasant day, perfect for a quick (and fruitful) lunchtime shoot at Green Spring Gardens. This is an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on a ‘Zowie’ Zinnia.

Note: I was actually trying to get a shot (with the tripod in place) of just the two Zinnias when the Swallowtail landed on one of the flowers. I held my breath and got just two shots before it flew off. I live for moments (and wild color) like this!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Orange Dead Leaf Butterfly

20 07 2011

While sitting (in the butterfly-shaped chair, of course) and trying to cool off in the Wings of Fancy observatory, I glanced over at the plethora of butterflies gathered to feast on rotting fruit (yum!) and saw a leaf moving. Is that a leaf? Is that a leaf eating that rotten banana? I had never seen anything like it—it was a butterfly camouflaged as a leaf! I learned from a volunteer that it is the Orange Dead Leaf Butterfly or Oakleaf Butterfly (Kallima inachus), native to tropical Asia, India and Japan. Although I never saw it open its wings to reveal the intense complementary colors of blue and orange, I did see it on an ID sign (see inset photo). This species, just like the Morpho Butterfly (that brilliant blue butterfly that never stays still long enough to let anyone photograph it!), is very dull-colored brown and tan on the outside, but so striking when the wings are open.





Brimstone Butterfly

20 07 2011

Brimstone Butterfly (Gonepteryx rhamni), photographed at Brookside Gardens’ Wings of Fancy exhibit

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Cairns Birdwing Butterfly

19 07 2011

Cairns Birdwing Butterfly (Ornithoptera euphorian), Australia’s largest native butterfly species; photographed at Brookside Gardens’ Wings of Fancy exhibit

Love butterflies? Check out more of my photos from the Wings of Fancy exhibit in 2008 here and here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Monarch Butterfly

19 07 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Here comes the sun(flower), do do do do…

19 07 2011

I shot this image at McKee-Beshers Wildlife Management Area in Montgomery County, Maryland. The sunflowers are shorter (once again) this year (some barely knee high), so it’s a challenge to get shots head on without groveling in the red dirt. The field was buzzing with honey bees, bumblebees, Cabbage White butterflies, cucumber beetles and various other flying critters. Very few of them cooperated for this photographer, though. I was bombarded several times by wayward bumblebees who tried to fly through me to get to a prized sunflower on their radar. Michael and I shared the field with only three other photographers (and a poorly constructed scarecrow that we thought was another person). I used a wide angle lens (atop a tall ladder) to get this shot.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Malachite Butterfly (Siproeta stelenes)

19 07 2011

Photographed at Brookside Gardens’ Wings of Fancy exhibit

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





A Monarch for Mary Ellen

19 07 2011

Monarch Butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. http://cindydyer.zenfolio.com/





Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

5 07 2011

An Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus) dines on a Stoke’s Aster (Stokesia laevis) against a backdrop of Purple Coneflowers (Echinacea purpurea) at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Buffet line

5 07 2011

A Fiery Skipper butterfly patiently awaits its turn behind a Bumblebee on a Stoke’s Aster, photographed at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Richmond, VA

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Stoke’s Aster

5 07 2011

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus) on Stoke’s Aster (Stokesia laevis)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





From the Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens archives…

29 06 2011

Since I didn’t get the photographic bounty I usually do at Kenilworth, I thought I’d repost images I’ve created in past years. Enjoy!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

KenilworthCollage2





Blooming in my garden: Mexican Butterfly Weed

20 06 2011

Mexican Butterfly Weed (Asclepias curassavica), also known as Blood-flower, Scarlet Milkweed or Tropical Milkweed, is an evergreen perennial plant and a favorite food source for Monarch butterfly caterpillars. The caterpillars eat the leaves and the adult butterfly sips its nectar. Milkweed contains a toxin that saves the butterfly from predators because of the bitter taste!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Re-post: White Peacock Butterfly (Anartia jatrophae) on Plumbago flower

26 05 2011

Originally posted August 8, 2010. Photographed at the Wings of Fancy exhibit at Brookside Gardensin Wheaton, Maryland

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.