Tulips

25 06 2019

Tulips (Nikon D850, Nikkor 105mm micro)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Pink Tulips x 2.jpg

Advertisement




Fringed tulips

25 06 2019

Fringed tulips (Nikon D850, Nikkor 105mm micro)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Fringed Tulips





Tulips

6 05 2019

Tulips in my garden (Nikon D850 with the 105mm micro lens)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Three Yellow Tulips





Scilla siberica ‘Spring Beauty’

7 04 2019

Scilla siberica ‘Spring Beauty’ (also known as Spring Beauty Scilla, Wood Squill or Siberian Squill) Photographed with an iPhone 8Plus using the Camera+ 2 app in macro mode

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Attachment-1 (6)





iPhoneography: Carolyn’s paperwhites

13 02 2019

iPhone 8Plus, Camera+ 2 app in macro mode

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Attachment-1 (4)





Parrot tulips

20 04 2016

Parrot tulips (unknown cultivars), photographed at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens in Vienna, VA

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Three Tulips lorez





Tulipmania!

2 05 2015

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

PinkYellowTulipLorez





Striped Siberian squill and Hyacinth

1 05 2015

I shot these two beauties with my iPhone 6 a few weeks ago. I always have my Nikon D800 with me on photo excursions, but now I’m also shooting with my phone from time to time just to play a bit (images processed with Snapseed2, now one of my favorite apps to use). These were shot at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, VA.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Two Flowers GS





Yummy!

20 04 2014

I was in heaven photographing these double flowering tulips against a backdrop of violas at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

CandyShopColorslorez





Lycoris radiata (Red Spider Lily)

11 09 2011

This lovely perennial, also known as Spider Lily and Naked Lily, is a member of the Amaryllis family and was introduced to the U.S. in 1854 by Captain William Roberts with just three bulbs he acquired in Japan. I photographed this bloom this afternoon at Green Spring Gardens.

Learn “How to Grow Your Garden Photography Skills” in my recent profile with Nikon here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





‘Queen Fabiola’

6 06 2011

Queen Fabiola (Triteleia laxa); common name—Ithuriel’s Spear; photographed at Green Spring Gardens. Perennial in zones 7-10, prefers full sun for most prolific blooming, drought tolerant, 10-20 elongated Agapanthus-like flowers per stem, blooms in late spring to early summer, grown from bulbs.

It has such a long name for such a tiny and delicate flower. The real Queen Fabiola is Dona Fabiola María de las Victorias Antonia Adelaida de Mora y Aragón (now that is a long name!), a member of the Belgian Royal Family. She is called Her Majesty Queen Fabiola of the Belgians.

Learn more about this flower here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Blooming in my garden: Alliums

28 04 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Tulip trio

22 03 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Fringed Tulips

22 03 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Study of Summer Snowflakes

26 03 2010

I photographed Summer Snowflakes (Leucojum Aestivum) at Green Spring Gardens last year (see that posting here, along with a nifty photography tip!), and then planted a dozen bulbs in my own garden—and they’re now in bloom again here! I think they have a Calder-esque look to them, don’t you?—like little mobiles or elegant sculptures. I especially like the tension of all the converging leaf lines combined with the curving of the flowers—so graphic! Today was such a good and creative day (even after I had to put away the camera and get back to my paying design work!) Here’s wishing all my days could be like this one!

Addendum: Last year, when I was trying to identify them, I thought they were SnowDROPS. These are actually SnowFLAKES. The Snowflake is a taller flower that normally has more than one flower per stem. Snowflake petals are even and have green spots on each end. Snowdrops have helicopter-like petals and the green appears on the inner petals.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Spring Beauty

25 03 2010

One of my favorite little spring flowers at Green Spring Gardens is Scilla siberica ‘Spring Beauty’—also known as Spring Beauty Scilla, Wood Squill or Siberian Squill (Liliaceae family). Tiny and delicate bright porcelain blue flowers grow on 4-6 inch stalks from bulbs in early spring in full sun to part shade. Tough and extremely cold hardy (Zones 2-8), this low-maintenance plant naturalizes easily by bulb offshoots and through self-seeding. Until this morning, I had never seen the underside of these shy, downward-facing blooms. The wind had flipped back a few blossoms, revealing their “faces.”

I also photographed a white form, ‘Alba.’ Green Spring Gardens also grows a striped squill, Puschkinia libanotica. The website tulipworld.com states that although this striped form is hardly known, it is one of the best bulbs for beginners because it can be grown almost anywhere as long as there is proper drainage. And their price is right, too—40 bulbs for just $9.71—can’t beat that!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Halleluiah light

14 04 2009

In the North Wing of the Conservatory at the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, there are hordes of Easter Lilies in full bloom. In one corner I noticed the flowers in shade. In this one flower, I noticed the water drop. As I was getting set up to photograph it, the sun broke through the clouds and illuminated the shaft of this one flower! I call this “Halleluiah Light,” because I can just hear the angels singing!

Did you know that 95% of the 11.5 million Easter Lilies grown and sold originate from the border of California and Oregon? The area is labeled the “Easter Lily Capital of the World.”

From http://www.about.com:

Lilium longiflorum is actually a native of the southern islands of Japan. A World War I soldier, Louis Houghton, is credited with starting U.S. Easter Lily production when he brought a suitcase full of lily bulbs with him to the southern coast of Oregon in 1919. He gave them away to friends and when the supply of bulbs from Japan was cut off as a result of the attack on Pearl Harbor, the rising price of the bulbs suddenly made the lily business a viable industry for these hobby growers and earned the bulbs the nickname “White Gold.”

And if you have cats, please keep them away from this plant! Any part of this lily, as many of its relatives, can cause kidney failure in cats. Eating even one leaf can be fatal. There is a handy list of plants that are poisonous to cats compiled by the Cat Fanciers’ Association, Inc., here. For more information about what types of Lily plants to avoid, read the information here. I do grow Stargazers and Asiatic Lilies (in pots and out of reach), but my cats are kept indoors and when they are (very briefly) outdoors in the summer, they are under strict supervision—plus, their very own bed of catnip keeps them occupied the entire time! They never have been plant nibblers, so I’ve been fortunate that they ignore all of our house plants. I did get rid of a pencil cactus (which was out of the way anyway) as soon as I found out they are highly poisonous.

See another example of this serendipitous light here in a post I did last summer.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

easterlilycloseup





Spring Beauty

1 04 2009

Scilla siberica ‘Spring Beauty’—also known as Spring Beauty Scilla or Siberian Squill (Liliaceae family). Showy blue flowers bloom from bulbs in April in full sun to part shade. Tough and extremely cold hardy (Zones 2-8), this low-maintenance plant naturalizes easily by bulb offshoots and through self-seeding. Learn more about this flower here. This site states that this particular Squill is great for forcing indoors. Guess what I’m growing indoors next winter!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

blueflowers





Snow(flakes) in the garden

17 04 2008

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Thanks to Kerry, I now know that the plant label identified this flower incorrectly. It is not a Snowdrop; it is a Snowflake! Thanks, Kerry!





Uh-oh, gotta have one of these now

11 04 2008

I really should be in bed now but after a full day of design work on the computer, I’m still up, restless and can’t sleep, so I’ve been perusing gardening blogs and bulb sites. Then this caught my eye and I’m thinking I must add at least one to my garden. I can just imagine the size of the hole I would have to dig to make a home for one of these bulbs (who am I kidding? I’d beg Michael to dig them for me). And they’re pricey, too. (Just imagine how sad you would be if your green thumb failed you on this purchase!). They’re “Giant white squills,” a plant I’ve never even heard about (and which I now seriously covet). The bulbs are each ten years old, 8 inches across, and cost $25 each. Whoa.

Get ’em here:

http://www.easytogrowbulbs.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=696