Stack ‘o butterflies

10 09 2019

I think the top and bottom ones might be Clouded Sulphurs, middle one is a Variegated Fritillary; feasting on Purple coneflowers (with purple Lantana in the background)

Nikon D850, Nikkor 105mm micro lens, 1/250 sec, f/14, ISO 400

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Stacked Butterflies WEB

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Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

6 08 2017

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

WEB Eastern Tiger





Common Morpho (Morpho peleides)

29 03 2015

I got this shot of a Common Morpho (at the Franklin Conservatory in Columbus, OH this past weekend) from almost the same vantage point as my friend, neighbor and fellow photographer Michael Powell got his shot. He was able to get more of the other wing because he has the added advantage of being several inches taller! It is so rare to be able to get a shot of the beautiful blue side of this elusive, quick-moving butterfly. We were thrilled that it stayed on the leaf long enough for both of us to get some shots.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Common Morph lorez





Re-post: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Zinnie ‘Zowie’

14 01 2015

Temps have been in the 30s and 40s here in (usually sunny) Texas, with murky gray skies almost every day. I’m in need of some color!

Originally posted July 27, 2010

Overcast and very pleasant day, perfect for a quick (and fruitful) lunchtime shoot at Green Spring Gardens. This is an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on a ‘Zowie’ Zinnia.

Note: I was actually trying to get a shot (with the tripod in place) of just the two Zinnias when the Swallowtail landed on one of the flowers. I held my breath and got just two shots before it flew off. I live for moments (and wild color) like this!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Silver-spotted skipper

30 07 2013

Silver-spotted skipper (Epargyreus clarus) on chives (I think it is chives); photographed at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

SilverSpottedSkipper





Not too shabby for a point-n-shoot, huh?

10 08 2011

Yesterday Michael and I took our guests out for their first vineyard/wine tasting experience and to see the Blue Ridge Mountains. Since I don’t drink, I wandered around the three different vineyards looking for things to photograph with my “baby camera,” the Nikon Coolpix L110. It has macro capabilities and this is really the first time I’ve used that feature since I bought it last year. I like to carry a small point-n-shoot in my purse at all times, and this is my fourth one—and by far my favorite. The Nikon Coolpix L110 has 12.1 megapixels, 15x optical zoom-Nikkor glass lens, 3 inch display, VR image stabilization, motion detection, 720p HD video recording with stereo sound, and can shoot up to 6400 ISO. The macro function gets you as close as 0.4 inches!

While Michael, Sean and Anna tasted wines, I stalked this Great Spangled Fritillary (Speryeria cybele) on the patio at Gadino Cellars in Rappahannock County, VA. The critter was quite focused on the task at hand, so I was able to get several decent shots using the macro function (and without a tripod, I still got a sharp image). I also recorded a short video of it with the camera (it won’t win any documentary awards, unfortunately), but it does show that with this little camera you get quite a lot of bang for your buck (under $300). I recommend it if you’re looking for something small that also has video capability—and the macro feature is pretty amazing, too!

UPDATE: My Hearing Loss Magazine editor, Barbara Kelley, was looking for a point-n-shoot recommendation and says the Nikon Coolpix L110 has been discontinued and is now replaced by the L120, which is 14.1 megapixels and has a longer zoom (21x). It’s available for about the same price ($279 at Target and on amazon.com).

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Same time, last year: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on ‘Zowie’ Zinnia

27 07 2011

Originally posted July 27, 2010

Overcast and very pleasant day, perfect for a quick (and fruitful) lunchtime shoot at Green Spring Gardens. This is an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on a ‘Zowie’ Zinnia.

Note: I was actually trying to get a shot (with the tripod in place) of just the two Zinnias when the Swallowtail landed on one of the flowers. I held my breath and got just two shots before it flew off. I live for moments (and wild color) like this!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Malachite Butterfly (Siproeta stelenes)

19 07 2011

Photographed at Brookside Gardens’ Wings of Fancy exhibit

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Stoke’s Aster

5 07 2011

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus) on Stoke’s Aster (Stokesia laevis)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





How many more days until spring?

11 02 2011

These images were all shot in one my most favorite photography spots in the world—Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia. When things are in bloom, I escape to this place as fast and as often as I can, even if it’s just for a half hour of shooting. It is my respite, my calm, my own private paradise…just me with my camera, surrounded by bountiful blooms and bustling bugs under a balmy blue sky. It is where I go to think, to dream, to regroup, to create. Spring can’t come soon enough for me!

See more images shot at Green Spring Gardens here.

© Cindy Dyer. All right reserved.





Skipper on ‘Zowie’ Zinnia

7 09 2010

Photographed at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Skippers on ‘Zowie’ Zinnia

3 09 2010

Photographed at Green Spring Gardens, 9.3.2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Common Buckeye on Gomphrena

3 09 2010

Photographed at Green Spring Gardens, 9.3.2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Banded Orange (Dryadula phaetusa)

8 08 2010

Photographed at the Wings of Fancy exhibit at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, Maryland

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

30 07 2010

Meadowlark Botanical Gardens’ “Experimental Meadow” was full of Eastern Tiger Swallowtails, Spicebush Swallowtails (click here to see the incredible caterpillar that this particular butterfly morphs from), American Painted Lady Butterflies, Silver-spotted Skippers, and Cabbage White Butterflies today.

Mary Ellen—no sighting of Monarchs at this garden today, unfortunately. I have seen a few in my garden this summer. In 1999 Mary Ellen founded Happy Tonics, Inc., a nonprofit 501(c)(3) environmental education organization and public charity. Happy Tonics also created the Monarch Butterfly Sanctuary in Shell Lake, Wisconsin, a few years ago. I met Mary Ellen when I purchased milkweed seed from her eBay store and we have collaborated on design and environmental projects ever since!

GREAT PHOTO TIP! Here’s a butterfly photography trick I learned from Mary Ellen a few years ago. Wait until the butterfly has it proboscis inserted into a flower and it becomes completely distracted by the task at hand—then move in closer, staying as still as possible.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

28 07 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Zowie!

27 07 2010

Overcast and very pleasant day, perfect for a quick (and fruitful) lunchtime shoot at Green Spring Gardens. This is an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on a ‘Zowie’ Zinnia. I wish the edge of the right wing was a tad sharper, but I had to move quickly to even get this shot! Stay tuned, more images to come.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Pow!

6 10 2009

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

http://cindydyer.zenfolio.com/p270076135

NewPhotos





Not so mellow yellow

3 02 2009

I had so many yellow-dominant photos in my archives that I had to shrink the images a little more than usual to get them to all fit into a more manageable collage—otherwise, you would be scrolling down for days. This is just the tip of the iceberg. Purple’s comin’ ’round the corner. Enjoy!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

notsomellowyellow3






A flash of blue

6 09 2008

As promised, here are two photos of the very elusive Blue Morpho butterfly from the Wings of Fancy exhibit at Brookside Gardens. And despite the fact that the bottom photo is just a blur of motion, it’s not as bad as I originally thought. It certainly shows how beautiful this butterfly is.

It is about a 115-day process from egg stage until it reaches adulthood. Native to the tropical rainforests of Central America, South America, and Mexico, the Blue Morpho is one of over 80 species of the genus Morpho. It is one of the largest butterflies in the world, with wings spanning from 5 to 8 inches. The iridescent blue color is a result of the microscopic scales on the backside of their wings that reflect light. The contrasting dull brown exterior and the brilliant blue interior serves as a protective measure—as the Blue Morpho flies, it confuses potential predators. (Trust me, it works. I had a hard time following them!)

As a caterpillar, it chews leaves of various trees; as an adult, it can no longer chew. It drinks its food instead, preferring the juice of rotting fruit, fluids of decomposing animals, fungi, wet mud, and tree sap. Blue Morphos are severely threatened by deforestation of tropical forests and habitat destruction, and humans are a direct threat because of their desire to collect them.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Wings of Fancy at Brookside Gardens

5 09 2008

This morning Michael and I went to photograph the “Wings of Fancy” live butterfly exhibit, in its 12th year at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, Maryland. The exhibit is at the South Conservatory and is open from 10:00 a.m. — 4:00 p.m. daily through September 21. Admission is $5.00 for adults, $4 for children ages 3-12, and free for children age 2 and under.

The website mentions that the greenhouse is usually ten degrees warmer than the outside. They weren’t kidding about that! It got pretty uncomfortable after about 20 minutes, but we were so excited about the myriad photographic opportunities that we just plugged ahead—glasses steamed, brows sweating. One of the volunteers said there are several hundred butterflies in the conservatory, representing 60 different species from Asia, Costa Rica, and North America.

These are just a few of the butterflies in the conservatory:

Atlas Moth (with a wingspan of at least 6 inches!)
Zebra Mosaic
Clipper
Giant Swallowtail
Julia Heliconian
Paper Kite
Banded Purple Wing
White Peacock
Cydno Longwing
Mexican Shoemaker
Tiger Longwing
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail
Question Mark
Agentinean Canna Skipper
American Giant Swallowtail
Malachite
Browntip
Painted Lady
Red Postman
Gray Cracker
Common Morpho
Common Mormon
Monarch
Gulf Fritillary

The collage below shows 29 different butterflies and moths in the exhibit. You’ll notice three of the same type (the dark brown and light blue butterfly; 5th one down). I was able to get numerous different shots of this species. The most elusive was the Common Morpho, which rarely settled in one place long enough to photograph one. Wings closed, this rather large butterfly is various shades of brown with bronze-colored “eyes” on its wings. Wings open, it is the most gorgeous shade of metallic azure blue! I was able to get one shot with wings close and just a touch of the blue showing. I’ll post that separately. I did get one shot open, but it was on the window and the image isn’t tack sharp. I’ll post it anyway just to show how beautiful this butterfly is. Two of the images in this collage show mating butterflies, which the volunteers pointed out to us so we could photograph them.

© Cindy Dyer. All right reserved.





Monarch butterfly habitat poster

25 04 2008

I recently designed this sample poster for Happy Tonics to use as an educational tool to show what native plants will be grown in the Monarch Butterfly Sanctuary that is being developed in Shell Lake, Wisconsin (http://www.shelllakeonline.com/).

You can learn more about Mary Ellen, Happy Tonics, and the Monarch Butterfly Habitat at http://www.happytonics.org/. In addition to utilizing photos from my own archives, other images were provided by Happy Tonics, Jeff Evans (http://evansimagesandart.com), and Brian Loflin (http://www.loflin-images.com/).

Learn more about Monarch butterflies at this site: http://www.monarch-butterfly.com/





Wings for Jennifer

24 01 2008

Here ya go, Jen! 🙂

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

wingsforjenni.jpg