Fleabane daisies

14 05 2012

Thanks to my blog buddy and fellow photographer, Steve Schwartzman (Portraits of Wildflowers), I now know this is a type of Fleabane daisy, growing rampant in the wildflower fields at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens. Each bloom is tiny—less than 1/2 inch in diameter.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Detail of Torch flower

12 05 2012

Macro detail of a Torch flower (Kniphofia ‘Coral Glow’), photographed at Meadowlark Botanical Gardens

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

30 07 2010

Meadowlark Botanical Gardens’ “Experimental Meadow” was full of Eastern Tiger Swallowtails, Spicebush Swallowtails (click here to see the incredible caterpillar that this particular butterfly morphs from), American Painted Lady Butterflies, Silver-spotted Skippers, and Cabbage White Butterflies today.

Mary Ellen—no sighting of Monarchs at this garden today, unfortunately. I have seen a few in my garden this summer. In 1999 Mary Ellen founded Happy Tonics, Inc., a nonprofit 501(c)(3) environmental education organization and public charity. Happy Tonics also created the Monarch Butterfly Sanctuary in Shell Lake, Wisconsin, a few years ago. I met Mary Ellen when I purchased milkweed seed from her eBay store and we have collaborated on design and environmental projects ever since!

GREAT PHOTO TIP! Here’s a butterfly photography trick I learned from Mary Ellen a few years ago. Wait until the butterfly has it proboscis inserted into a flower and it becomes completely distracted by the task at hand—then move in closer, staying as still as possible.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.