Daffodils

25 06 2019

Daffodils (missed this one from a series I shot back in April) Nikon D850, Nikkor 105mm micro

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Scilla siberica ‘Spring Beauty’

7 04 2019

Scilla siberica ‘Spring Beauty’ (also known as Spring Beauty Scilla, Wood Squill or Siberian Squill) Photographed with an iPhone 8Plus using the Camera+ 2 app in macro mode

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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iPhoneography: Carolyn’s paperwhites

13 02 2019

iPhone 8Plus, Camera+ 2 app in macro mode

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Curl

12 04 2018

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Curly Tulip WEB





iPhoneography: Bradford pear blooms

3 04 2018

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. iPhone 7Plus / Snapseed app borders

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iPhoneography: Saucer magnolia blooms

3 04 2018

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. iPhone 7Plus / Snapseed app borders

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Capillaries

16 03 2018

I shot this image at a rest stop in Arkansas en route home to Virginia this week. My friend Greg purchased the new Nikon D850 (which I have been dreaming about) and let me play with it on this trip. I knew I’d love it! Now to just find some spare change in the couch ($3,300 to be exact).

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Capillaries lorez

 





Forget-me-nots

2 05 2015

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Forgetmenotsbench





Nesting

30 04 2015

A Mourning dove has built her nest in a plant pot on the top of my gardening bench. You can see part of one of two babies to her right (black with white streaks). I can’t do my annual cleanup in that area until after flying lessons are given! Isn’t she pretty? (iPhone 6 with Snapseed2)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

DoveBabyLorez





My spirits soar…

30 04 2015

All through the long winter, I dream of my garden.
On the first day of spring, I dig my fingers deep into the soft earth.
I can feel its energy, and my spirits soar.

—Helen Hayes

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. (Shot with my iPhone 6, processed with Snapseed2)

Spring Trees lorez





Revisiting “How to Grow Your Garden Photography Skills”

24 03 2014

It’s (almost) that time again! Time to get out your camera (and your macro lens, if you’re fortunate to have one!) and get out in the garden to start capturing images of early spring flowers. (And if you don’t have a tripod, please get one. As much as you may not like toting one around, they are instrumental in capturing really sharp macro images; trust me on this!)

In my front yard garden, I already have purple crocus in bloom and the Hellebores have been blooming since February (hardy and eager plants, those Hellebores!). The tulips will probably be in bloom in a couple of weeks. Even though spring officially started this past Thursday, apparently Mother Nature has different ideas for us—snow is predicted for our area this coming Tuesday! (UG)

Two years ago I was interviewed and featured on the Nikonusa.com website about photographing gardens. Since the weather is getting warmer every day and early spring flowers are making their appearance in our part of the country, I thought I’d share the article and accompanying photos with you again! Click on the link below:

http://www.nikonusa.com/Learn-And-Explore/Photography-Techniques/gr35ffdt/all/How-To-Grow-Your-Garden-Photography-Skills.html





Cymbidium Happy Days ‘Green Dragon’ orchid

21 02 2013

How pretty is this green orchid?

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

HappyGreen





Flowers in February?

7 02 2012

This afternoon I made a quick trip over to Green Spring Gardens to meet with one of the horticulturists to verify that I have all of my plant IDs correct (thanks for your assistance, Mary!). From my short walk through the parking lot to the Horticulture Center, I saw a few Daffodils (Narcissus), several clusters of Snowdrops (Galanthus) and a few types of Crocus (I think these are Snow Crocus).

I know it’s only February 6 and Punxsutawney Phil did ‘predict’ six more weeks of “winter” last week, but I didn’t see much in the way of that season today at Green Spring Gardens! Not expecting to find anything to photograph, I didn’t bring my “big girl” camera, but I happened to have my Nikon Coolpix L110 in my bag and got a few shots of this flower cluster. The sight of flowers, however sparse, banished my SAD immediately!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





More Columbine blooms

16 05 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Pink Columbine

15 05 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





This one’s for Sue: Lily-of-the-Valley blooms

10 05 2011

When my friend Sue moved to Huntsville a few years ago, she divvied up her plants and gave this Lily-of-the-Valley (Convallaria majalis) to our friend Gina, who has nurtured it ever since. Gina wanted me to photograph it to show Sue that it went to a good home. It survives Northern Virginia winters admirably and blooms profusely in this little shabby chic watering can.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





In Karen’s garden: Bearded Iris

9 05 2011

Karen says these Bearded Iris plants have been blooming in three large pots in her backyard garden for nearly a decade. She gets fewer and fewer blooms each year because they really needed to be divided. And guess who volunteered to help her out? One, it solves her blooming problem and two, I don’t have this color in my garden!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the Bearded Triplets

9 05 2011

Ooooh…how orderly! (not unlike me 😉

These are just three of the 28 (yes, I counted) Bearded Iris now in bloom in our front yard garden, with many more to come…

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Blooming in my garden: Bearded Iris

3 05 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Blooming in my garden: Viola sororia ‘Freckles’

28 04 2011

The rare and unusual Sister Violet (Viola sororia) ‘Freckles’, with heart-shaped evergreen leaves and tiny snow white blooms speckled with deep purple spots, is similar to a wild violet. This hardy perennial likes well-drained soil in full to part sun (mine is in shade for a good part of the day). It’s a great plant for naturalistic shade gardens and it spreads by seed and underground rhizomes. I planted my first bunch a few years ago in an egg shaped wire sculpture perched atop a big urn. This year the plant has escaped from its cage and began spreading on the ground!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Blooming in my garden: Lily-of-the-Valley

28 04 2011

Lily-of-the-Valley (Convallaria majalis), with extremely tiny unidentified insect (can you spot him?). I didn’t see it until I zoomed in on the image in Photoshop!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Blooming in my garden: Alliums

28 04 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Rhododendron

26 04 2011

The name ‘Rhododendron’ is derived from Greek—rhódon (rose) and déndron (tree). This genus has over 1000 species of woody plants and includes azaleas. Photographed at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Columbine

26 04 2011

Columbine (Aquilegia), photographed at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Meadow Rue

26 04 2011

Meadow Rue (Thalictrum ichangense), photographed at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Blooming in my garden: Grape Hyacinths

10 04 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Blooming in my garden: Hellebores

10 04 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Blooming in my garden: Daffodils

10 04 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Geranium Daffodil (Narcissus ‘Geranium’)

7 04 2011

Photographed at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Spring in Texas: Bluebonnets!

28 03 2011

Photographed in Austin, Texas, 3.26.2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Fringed Tulips

22 03 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Grape Hyacinth

21 03 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Spring glow

21 03 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Check out my newly-updated Zenfolio botanical gallery (with almost 600 photos!) here.





Spring has sprung!

21 03 2011

Yesterday was officially the first day of spring, so it was fitting that my friend Karen and I make a stop at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden while we were out at her lakehouse in Lake Land ‘Or. The botanical garden is just 30 minutes away. This photograph was made in the conservatory, which was just a jumble of spring color.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Pink sheep

21 03 2011

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Triumph Tulip ‘Negrita’

21 03 2011

Triumph tulips result from crossings between varieties of short-stemmed Early tulips and long-stemmed Darwin tulips. They are hardy in Zones 3-8 and make excellent potted plants. They require full sun and bloom in mid-spring. I photographed this beautiful bloom against a backdrop of bright yellow daffodils in the conservatory at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Muscari (Grape Hyacinth)

21 03 2011

I think this specimen could be Muscari ‘Valerie Finnis’ or Muscari azureum. Anyone care to confirm? I photographed this tiny flower at the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Richmond this afternoon. More little spring beauties to come…

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Flowers in the mist…

22 04 2010

Green Spring Gardens, 1:24 p.m. A steady mist on a dreary day. D300 and 105mm micro in hand, Army blanket on the ground. Sharing the park with one photographer, two walkers under umbrellas, and two grazing deer coming from the woods. Blissful in spite of the weather!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Thursday blooms

1 04 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Study of Summer Snowflakes

26 03 2010

I photographed Summer Snowflakes (Leucojum Aestivum) at Green Spring Gardens last year (see that posting here, along with a nifty photography tip!), and then planted a dozen bulbs in my own garden—and they’re now in bloom again here! I think they have a Calder-esque look to them, don’t you?—like little mobiles or elegant sculptures. I especially like the tension of all the converging leaf lines combined with the curving of the flowers—so graphic! Today was such a good and creative day (even after I had to put away the camera and get back to my paying design work!) Here’s wishing all my days could be like this one!

Addendum: Last year, when I was trying to identify them, I thought they were SnowDROPS. These are actually SnowFLAKES. The Snowflake is a taller flower that normally has more than one flower per stem. Snowflake petals are even and have green spots on each end. Snowdrops have helicopter-like petals and the green appears on the inner petals.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Your guess is as good as mine.

25 03 2010

No plant label on this beauty at Green Spring Gardens…so I’m stumped. Wanna hazard to guess what it is? It was in the woodland garden area and it was blooming in the shade. The blooms were small, too (maybe 1-1.5 inches), perched atop reddish-orange stems. I had to lie down on my side (in the mud, thank you very much) to photograph the downward-facing blooms. Oh, the things I do for you people!

😉

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Hellebores in bloom

25 03 2010

As promised, new garden photos—I shot these early this morning in our front yard garden. After dropping off (yet more) donations to the Salvation Army, Michael and I spent an hour photographing blooms at Green Spring Gardens. More flower photos to come!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






Plant shopping!

24 03 2010

Because of the various gaps in my front and back yard gardens (due to the age of the garden and our crazy winter weather), I’ll need to do a bit more planting than usual this year. We also took out two butterfly bushes that grew too big for the space, so that left two big gaps in the side garden. (Note: When the tag on the plant states that a butterfly bush grows 5-8 feet wide, do not ignore it and buy the plants just because they are “today only, just $5 each!”). I speak from experience: if you have a townhouse garden, you do not have the room for this monster—much less two of them!) They will be relocated somewhere else where they have room to spread.

I just ordered some replacement plants from Michigan Bulb Company, Spring Hill Nursery and Dutch Bulbs this week and got some really great deals, particularly with their “buy x, get x free” specials. I’m adding things that I would love to photograph this year and most species that I haven’t grown before. I’ll add few more things like herbs (basil, mint and oregano) for my kitchen garden. I also bought inexpensive bulbs from Wal-Mart this week, too (Liatris, Crocosmia and my favorite, lilies!). I’m filling in the gaps with these great deals and since they’re all perennials, I should have easy sailing for a few more years.

From the Michigan Bulb Co., I ordered (left to right, top to bottom, photos from catalog): Sparkle Meadow Rue, Green Wizard Rudbeckia, Foamflower, Montana Skies Delphinium, Toad Lily Mix, Twinkle Toes, Double-Decker Coneflower, Licorice Mint, Petite Delight Bee Balm, Blue Fringe Daisy, Helenium Mix and Blue Mist Shrub

From van Bourgondein (dutchbulbs.com), I ordered (left to right, photos from catalog): Gloriosa Rothschildiana (gorgeous!), Habeneria Radiata/Egret Flower (I’m really excited about growing and photographing this unusual beauty—not an inexpensive bulb, but I’ve been wanting one ever since they debuted—tell me this isn’t one of the coolest plants you’ve ever seen!), and Hardy Gladiolus Atom (love the white piping outline—wait, is that a 3 point reverse rule around those petals?!)

And finally, from Spring Hill Nursery, I ordered (left to right, photos from catalog): Coral Drops, Lemon Fluff (how cute are these?) and Anchusa Azurea

Wish me luck with my green thumb and be on standby for photographs throughout this spring and summer!





31 days to spring…just gimme some color!

17 02 2010

Enough with this gray and white and cold! Revisiting some of my favorite images…





Self-diagnosed S.A.D.

16 02 2010

Yep, that’s me. I proclaim myself a victim of SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder). According to Wikipedia: SAD, also known as winter depression or winter blues, is a mood disorder in which people who have normal mental health throughout most of the year experience depressive symptoms in the winter.

As I look out my studio window this afternoon, I see more snow coming down. Projection: 4 inches of the inconvenient stuff. White stuff on top of older white stuff. It was pretty the first time it snowed this winter (Dec. 19), but after the first 4 inches, enough was enough. It was 26.4 inches total for that first snowfall alone. I think it has snowed at least six times since then, including the 30″ we got over February 5. Fortunately, we were in sunny Florida during that blizzard, but we came home to the aftermath, followed by the additional 10.5 inches we got two days later on February 10. Ah yes, it was pretty the first time. Now it is just a pain. If I wanted this kind of snowfall, I would have already moved to any one of those snowy states starting with the letter “M”—Maine, Montana, Minnesota or Michigan.

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Well, whaddyaknow—there is actually a named disorder for the SAD condition experienced in summer—Reverse Seasonal Affective Disorder, which is accompanied by anxiety (come experience an oppressively hot D.C. summer and you’ll know what they’re talking about!)

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Hmmmm…what cheers me up? The promise of spring (32 days and counting, although by the looks of things, I beg to differ). And gardening. And lots of flowers to photograph. And on that note, I leave you (and temporarily, my SAD symptoms) with a series of collages of photos I shot in my Garden Club members’ gardens a few years ago. Sigh….somewhere under the “white crap accumulation,” there are bulbs hibernating and dormant plants dreaming of the sun. Keepin’ the faiiiiiiittttth, yay yay yay yay, keepin’ the faith…

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





All that’s left is a band of gold…

27 04 2009

April 18, 2009 / Highway 81 South / field of yellow flowers near the community of Natural Bridge, Virginia / Shenandoah Valley, Rockbridge County

I spoke to the proprietor of the Herring Hall B&B (in Natural Bridge) and she said the flowers, while definitely beautiful, are considered weeds and can take over a field in no time. She identified them as Wild Turnip (Brassica rapa), familiy Cruciferae.

The Plant For a Future database report states that the flowers are hermaphrodite (having both male and female organs) and are pollinated by bees. The plant is self-fertile and has medicinal uses.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

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Spring blooms at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden

14 04 2009

On Easter Sunday, Michael and I drove toward Richmond to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden to see what was in bloom. It was a bit too breezy for flower photography, but I did manage to get a few images that made it worth the trip. Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is celebrating spring from April 1-June 7 with their exhibit, “A Million Blooms,” a succession of blooms including Daffodils, Cherry blossoms, Tulips, Irises, Roses and Peonies. During our visit, we photographed the Daffodils, Tulips, Pansies, Euphorbias, Candytuft, Muscari and Easter Lilies that were in bloom. The Irises, Roses and Peonies should be in bloom later next month, as I recall from photographing them a few years ago. While in the Conservatory, we noticed a sign in the North Wing announcing an upcoming exhibit, Butterflies LIVE!. The exhibit will run from May 22-October 11, in honor of the Garden’s 25th Anniversary.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

ginterflowers





Blooming in my garden today…

10 04 2009

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

skinnytulip





Bonus bug(let)

10 04 2009

After seeing three sunny yellow tulips in bloom in my garden today, I grabbed my camera to go get some shots. Inside one of the blooms was this teeny little green bug, barely over 1/8″ long. I shot off several frames, painfully trying to focus and handhold the camera. I never even noticed the small blob by the bug’s back legs.

I opened several images in Photoshop and saw just an out-of-focus blob behind one of the back legs. Then I opened the last image and the blob was in sharper focus—it was her baby! —a miniature version of this already miniature insect. To give you a sense of scale, Mama bug would measure just a tad longer than the size of the baby you’re seeing onscreen now. So you can see why I overlooked Junior during the session.

While this image won’t win any awards for sharpness, technique, lighting or composition, I thought it was really sweet—all this life bundled up into the smallest packages imaginable, a tiny family out celebrating spring just like the rest of us….and this exercise shows you that no matter how observant I am (and I fancy myself to be pretty observant), some things can be overlooked regardless!

I had far too many things going against me to get more than a record shot—spring winds, how to position my body without bending and crushing the Alliums coming up nearby, branches from the butterfly bush poking me in the head, the size of microscopic Mama bug herself (much less her itty-bitty offspring), bad depth-of-field and mixed sun-and-shade lighting. Plus, I was too lazy to run back into the house, get a tripod, and set up like the pro I profess to be. Nevertheless, I’m still tickled with my discovery!

UPDATE: I just went back to study the image again. After zooming in, I could see extra legs at the end of Mama bug’s behind. Could it be? Yep, I opened up another image and it appears Mama has twins!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

babymommalorez





Blooming in my garden today…

9 04 2009

The ‘Lady Jane’ Tulips are blooming in the garden today. Although you can’t see it in this photo, this lovely blossom has a pink underside on each petal (see last year’s post below).

You can see more of these Tulips in a posting I did the same day (April 9) last year by clicking here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

whitelily