Ginkgo leaves

20 12 2018

Ginkgo leaves at Blandy Experimental Farm in Boyce, VA (I was trying out my new toy–a Nikon Coolpix P1000 with a 24mm-3000mm zoom!)

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Gingko Closeup WEB

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I’m likin’ this lichen!

20 05 2018

Rain is good for the garden. Too many days of rain is not good for me (or my beautiful Bearded irises, which I was fortunate to photograph in all their glory before the wet mess came). We’ve had about a week of solid rain. It let up some today and I saw a glimpse of the sun very briefly. Tomorrow’s forecast calls for sunny and no rain (yay!). I was at a Michael’s Craft Store and in the parking lot next to the car are several trees that are coated with various colors of lichen and moss. It’s actually quite beautiful and only in our rainforest-like weather could this occur. I went a little nuts with my iPhone using the Camera+ app in macro mode late this afternoon. I added the grunge borders in the Snapseed app. I plan on going back with my Nikon D850 to get some more images tomorrow.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Lichen Moss Collage





iPhoneography: Saucer magnolia blooms

3 04 2018

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. iPhone 7Plus / Snapseed app borders

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Capillaries

16 03 2018

I shot this image at a rest stop in Arkansas en route home to Virginia this week. My friend Greg purchased the new Nikon D850 (which I have been dreaming about) and let me play with it on this trip. I knew I’d love it! Now to just find some spare change in the couch ($3,300 to be exact).

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Capillaries lorez

 





iPhoneography: Last of the fall leaves

12 12 2017

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. iPhone 6s / Snapseed app border

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iPhoneography: Splendid fall

9 12 2017

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. iPhone 6s / Snapseed app border

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My spirits soar…

30 04 2015

All through the long winter, I dream of my garden.
On the first day of spring, I dig my fingers deep into the soft earth.
I can feel its energy, and my spirits soar.

—Helen Hayes

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved. (Shot with my iPhone 6, processed with Snapseed2)

Spring Trees lorez





Origami cranes?

3 11 2013

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Origami cranes





Calder-esque

26 07 2013

I photographed this beautiful (unidentified) tree outside the visitors center at Brookside Gardens yesterday morning. I thought it looked like an Alexander Calder mobile.

UPDATE: Thanks to a fellow gardener/blogger, Les (of www.atidewatergardener.blogspot.com), I think we may have an identification—Euphorbia cotinifolia.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

Calderesque





Buttonbush

28 06 2011

I photographed this Buttonbush cluster (Cephalanthus occidentalis), also known as Button willow and Honey balls, this morning at Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens in Washington, D.C. A native wetland tree, it can grow 10-15 feet tall and spread 15-30 feet. The mid-summer blooms are rich in nectar that attracts butterflies and other insects.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Golden blooms

7 04 2011

Photographed at Green Spring Gardens in Alexandria, Virginia (tree identification unknown)

Check out my newly-updated Zenfolio botanical gallery here.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.





Canna and Japanese Maple

19 08 2010

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.






I know what you can get me for my next birthday…

10 07 2009

TreeBedYes, I am fully aware that $15,000 is pretty pricey for a bed frame, but if just 15,000 of my currently 82,733 blog visitors chipped in just $1 each, I could sleep in this bed every night! Imagine that. (I didn’t account for tax and shipping charges, though—this thing must weigh quite a bit. Does anyone have a large truck?)

Of course, it might bring on recurring nightmares about the snake-and-doomed-robin-chick episode of last week that I posted here. The scene atop the bed looks eerily familiar. You see, I have this visual penchant for trees, leaves, nests, feathers, birds and eggs. Oh, and sleep. That’s a good thing, too. So, this present would combine four of those faves of mine in one simple gift. And you don’t even have to wrap it! Oh, and I’ll provide the linens, so no need to fret about including those.

Then again, $15,000 would buy at least three of the pricier prime Nikon lenses that I don’t already have but certainly still lust after. (Which ones, you ask? Oh, say the 600mm f/4D IF-ED II, the 200-400mm VR f/4 AF-S, and maybe the 200mm Micro f/4D IF-ED, in case you were curious or just taking notes.)

Tree bed, Nikon lenses. Tree bed, Nikon lenses. Hmmmm. What do you think? Talk amongst yourselves. I’m sure I’ll love whatever you get me.

Take a look at artist Shawn Lovell’s other metal creations on her website here. Beautiful work!





Amazing tree in downtown Key West

11 06 2009

I’m fairly certain that a Ficus aurea, or strangler fig, has taken over this tree (or group of trees) in downtown Key West. I did some research online and learned that they are common throughout the Caribbean and tropical Americas. You’ll find excellent and very detailed information about strangler figs with illustrative photos on this site: http://waynesword.palomar.edu/ploct99.htm

In the first photo, Michael serves as my scale reference. Doesn’t the second photo look like a scene out of a Harry Potter movie? If I have misidentified this unusual tree, enlighten me!

THIS JUST IN…Artist Val Webb posted this comment:

“It has been many years since I visited Key West, but I seem to recall that the tree in question is a banyan tree. There is a large one on the Thomas Edison property there.”

I looked up “banyan tree” and learned that a banyan is a fig tree that starts its life as an epiphyte when its seeds germinate in the cracks and crevices on a host tree. The seeds germinate and send down roots toward the ground, and may envelope part of the host tree…giving them the name of “strangler fig.” So apparently banyan is another name for it. Thanks for the input, Val!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

StranglerFig





Magnolia bud

2 04 2009

Magnolia bud, Green Spring Gardens

I don’t know exactly which species of Magnolia this is, but my web research revealed that there are 80 different species and they are native to the eastern United States and southeastern Asia. I assume that because the flower looks like it will be a pale yellow that it could be one of the two very popular yellow flowering cultivars—perhaps ‘Butterflies’ or ‘Gold Finch’. I did call and talk to a gardener this morning at Green Spring Gardens and she confirmed that it is a Magnolia.

I learned from the United States National Arboretum site that Magnolia flowers are typically pollinated by beetles. Magnolia flowers do not produce nectar but they do produce large quantities of pollen that is high in protein. Do check out the Arboretum’s web site—it’s well organized and very informative!

And because there is a society for virtually everything, I discovered Magnolia Society International. a worldwide organization of gardeners, nurserymen and other people who are devoted to the appreciation and study of Magnolias.

ID Update #1: I think this bud could be a Magnolia stellata — Star Magnolia or Royal Star Magnolia. The buds on this site look very similar to this one.

ID Update #2: A quick photo trip to Green Spring Gardens today (4/5)—I was able to identify the tree—Magnolia ‘Yellow Fever’—Yellow Fever Magnolia. There was just one bud halfway opened on the tree, so it may be a few more days before there’s something to photograph!

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

magnoliabud