Waterlilies in Nashville

3 05 2016

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

TwoPinkWaterlilies

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The Traveling Water Lilies Forever Stamps Project / Installment #12

24 07 2015

For Installment #12, in the top two rows we have Bailey Lojek Oliveria (Haleiwa, HI); my sunny friend and HLAA member Carol Halla (Charleston, SC); new friend Jeff Kleinrock (Kensington, MD), son of my friend and HLAA member Joan Kleinrock (he is a landscaper and grew water lilies; he had just bought the stamps and at his mother’s 80th birthday party a few weeks ago, he learned I was the photographer so he came over and introduced himself!); and my high school friend (actually her bed!) Cynthia Cruz Badilla (Alamo, TX).

Next we have my dear friend, HLAA member, and fellow member of H.A.R.P.S. (Honorary Association of the Red Pen Society) Judy Schefcick Martin (Jacksonville, FL) and Laura Pinaud Terrbonne (Jacksonville, FL)—they used the water lilies stamps for their Walk4Hearing kick-off announcements!

Next is my friend and uber-talented musician/singer/songwriter Katy Kinard (Nashville, TN). I met Katy online several years ago when she asked permission to use a landscape photo I shot of my friend Tom Hedstrom’s farm in Orange, VA. She wanted to use it for Lullaby Hymns CD. She later sent me copies of her CDs and I fell in love with her music! You will too—-http://www.katykinard.com. I hope to meet her in person some day soon, photograph her, and interview her for my blog and for my soon-to-debut creativity podcast (stay tuned!).

To Katy’s right is Pat Calelly (Spring, TX), who purchased the framed water lilies special issue. Pat is one great example of how blogging has allowed me to connect with people from all walks of life. When I was just 12 years old, I began studying oil painting with artist Lila Prater in Weslaco, TX. I was the youngest student she had in her studio at the time. I actually reconnected with Lila sometime in the 90s and she was about 92 years old then. She was in an assisted living home and had lost her eyesight. She remembered me and some of the images I painted under her guidance. It was such a treasure to be able to talk to her all those years later and thank her for everything she taught me. After blogging in 2012 about my time painting in her studio, her grandson Pat contacted me! (He commented on the post: Cindy, my name is Pat Calelly. I am Lila Prater’s grandson. I preached her funeral when she passed away but my remarks included recognition of her work as an art teacher and artist in her Weslaco, Texas home. My home is decorated with many of her oils and water colors and I have the sign for her studio as well. Both her daughters were artists as well and although my mother has passed away I have some of her work as well as that of her sister Phyllis Fleming, who is retired in Kerrville, Texas where she is a nationally recognized water color artist.) Pat is now a Facebook friend! You can read about “The Painting Years” here: https://cindydyer.wordpress.com/2011/12/29/the-painting-years-first-florals/

Next, my friend Betty Ferguson recruited yet another stamp collector out in a lovely field of sunflowers—Tammy (Denton, TX). My former roommate and longtime friend Wendy Soloway Paris sent her photo from her home in Shepherdstown, WV. I met Kashan Choy (Alexandria, VA) at the Kenilworth Water Lily & Lotus Festival earlier this month. She purchased stamps and stopped by my table to pose for me. Louise Clarke and Cathie Leighton came to the festival all the way from Median, PA, and had already used many of their stamps! And finally, Jeff & Sue posed with the special dedication poster at the festival.

THE ONES TO BEAT TO WIN A FREE GALLERY-WRAP CANVAS: Sue Cummings Titterington (27), Betty Ferguson (25), Steve Stroupe (14), Kathy Muchemore (7), Judy Schefcick Martin (8), Martha Biz (7), and James F. Williams (5). The contest ends at midnight on December 31, 2015, so start recruiting those stamp selfies!

Installment #12 Flat





Featured in the Washington Post!

9 07 2015

John Kelly interviewed me about photographing water lilies for his column in today’s edition of the Washington Post. Read his article in the link below.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/on-hot-summer-days-the-lotus-blossoms-of-kenilworth-beckon/2015/07/08/abc180ce-259b-11e5-aae2-6c4f59b050aa_story.html

JohnKellyArticle





The Traveling Water Lily Forever Stamp Project / Installment #6

20 05 2015

Thanks to all the participants who continue to submit to my “Traveling Water Lily Forever Stamps Project.”

For Installment #6, we have Dan (Texas) who happens to be wearing a really cool shirt with giant koi on it (how’s that for a nod to ponds?); my cousin Deanna (Georgia); my friend Hollace (Maryland); Joni (Couers Fleurs Farm in Kentucky)—I met Joni’s brother, Gary, when I was photographing one morning at Kenilworth and now I’m FB friends with him, Joni and her husband, Ed (all of whom have beautiful gardens that I want to photograph); Tammy (Georgia)—who is my cousin Deanna’s best friend AND, after some family history research last year, I have discovered that Tammy’s husband Darrell is actually my cousin, so that makes Tammy not just a friend but a cousin-in-law! (Is there such a thing?); Tammy used the stamps today on mail for their family business, Merritt Heating & Cooling; and last, but certainly not least, Elizabeth (Texas).

Installment #6





Spent blooms

28 06 2011

In past years the Lotus flowers have bloomed just in time for the annual Water Lily Festival and Festival of Lotus and Asian Culture at Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens on the third Saturday in July. This year the flowers, particularly the white variety, seem to have peaked much earlier than usual. Most are past their prime blooming stage, but there were lots of opportunities to photograph spent petals in those beautiful Lotus leaves! There are plenty of pink blooms that haven’t flowered yet, though, and there are several ponds that are chock full of beautiful magenta-colored water lilies. Click on the panoramic image below to enlarge for full effect!

The place was a flurry of activity this morning, with children on field trips and student volunteers doing everything from garden chores to turtle counting. They caught the turtles in nets, pulled them up, filed a notch in the shells of those that weren’t captured previously, then released them back into the ponds. Michael saw a foot-and-a-half-long snapping turtle pulled to the surface and then released. Before I knew they were doing the turtle counting procedure, I saw a four-inch-long Red-eared slider by the edge of one of the ponds and was able to get the “record shot” at right (definition of a record shot: certainly won’t win any awards, but they’re proof I was there!). We’re pretty sure the dent on his right side wasn’t the work of a turtle counter since Michael said they were making the file marks on the shells near the back of each turtle and the notches were very tiny.

As I was wrapping up my very brief photo session at the park (it was too sunny to shoot any winners; no clouds to help out, either!), I looked behind me on the path and saw something dark, shiny, at least four inches long, with lots of legs. My first thought was “very large spider!” I moved closer and saw it was a crayfish (crawfish or crawdad if you’re a southerner like me!), hanging out on dry land. I got this one (slightly blurry) record shot of him and he skidaddled (slowly and backwards) back into the nearby pond. It was officially my first crayfish/crawfish/crawdad sighting ever!