American Horticultural Society projects

31 03 2008

I’ve been working on design projects with the American Horticultural Society (http://ahs.org/) since 2006, thanks to an introduction to the organization by my dear friend and sage mentor (and employer many moons ago), Brian Loflin (http://www.loflin-images.com/). A few years ago, he taught a garden photography workshop for AHS at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin, Texas (http://www.wildflower.org/). I’m on my third National Children & Youth Garden Symposium campaign this year (layouts below are 2008, 2007, and 2006 campaigns). Since my introduction to the organization, I’ve worked with several departments on invitation projects, AHS Garden School brochures, and the latest AHS member publication, Garden Clippings. I’m fortunate to be able to incorporate many of my garden images into various projects, too!

© Cindy Dyer, Dyer Design. All rights reserved. www.cindydyer.wordpress.com

ahs-ygs-covers.jpg


Advertisement




Butterflies & Gardens, Issue #2

31 03 2008

I just completed my second issue of the newly-redesigned “Butterflies & Gardens” quarterly newsletter for Happy Tonics. You can download the 4-page pdf file here: www.cindydyer.com/ButterfliesGardens2.pdf I design and produce all work for Happy Tonics on a volunteer basis. This issue has many of my photos as well as a few contributed by my friend, Jeff Evans. Jeff shot the last four images included in the banner on page 1 and also the monarch caterpillars shot on page 4.

A little background on how I have become connected to Happy Tonics: a few years ago I purchased milkweed seeds on eBay from Mary Ellen and we became instant friends. I learned about her background and mission and decided to offer my design and photography services to her cause. I donated design and postcard printing costs for one project and have just completed this second issue (redesigned) of the publication. I’m also working on an organization logo and a plant identification poster. Mary Ellen and her organization, Happy Tonics, (http://www.happytonics.org/) have begun establishing a monarch butterfly and native plant sanctuary near Shell Lake, Wisconsin.

Read here about her efforts: http://www.superiorbroadcast.org/butterfly.htm

© Cindy Dyer, Dyer Design. All rights reserved.

happy-tonics-2.jpg





In my heaven…

13 03 2008

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

More shots from this year’s Orchid show at the U.S. Botanic Garden.

secondorchids.jpg





A riot of color

12 03 2008

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

botaniccollage308.jpg

My friend Carmen finally made it over to the U.S. Botanic Garden (http://www.usbg.gov/) this year. The exhibit at the entrance to the building is their first-ever textile exhibit, “A Stitch in Vine,” featuring beautiful botanically-themed quilts handmade by artists of the Chesapeake & Potomac Applique Guild (http://www.quiltguilds.com/maryland.htm).

Also on display is the annual orchid exhibit. This year’s exhibit is titled, “An Alphabet Garden of Orchids,” and remains on display through April 13. There seemed to be even more plants on display this year than last, so there were ample photo ops. These are just a few of the more graphic shots I got.





The Cyclamen sentry

11 03 2008

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

FYI: I did learn that cyclamen plants are poisonous to cats—she was only on the table briefly and she’s not a plant eater, anyway—which we’re grateful for. I ended up giving all the plants away eventually. I also had to give away a pencil cactus after learning the sap is poisonous!

cyclamensentry.jpg





White Cyclamen

11 03 2008

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

lowrezcyclamen.jpg





Two penny Cyclamen

11 03 2008

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

cyclamenalt.jpg





Po folks gardenin’

11 03 2008

Princess Gigi’s day started out like any other day. Coffee served in bed. A dose of Good Morning America, followed by Regis & Kelly. All the while, thoughts of spring swirled in her sleepy head. Thoughts of Wal-Mart and her need to usher in the season. Off she went, in her gas guzzling cherry red Jeep, to the big box giant. She expected to find her usual treasures that included Super Bubble gum and Cinnamon Toast Crunch, and perhaps some seasonal delights such as Nerds jelly beans. As she felt her blood sugar dwindling, she opted for a triple thick chocolate shake (small, of course) from McDonalds. And, not forgetting her one-eyed dawg, Gumbo, she picked up a plain double cheeseburger from the nifty dollar menu. After perusing the “fashion offerings” in the women’s department, she felt her pulse quicken as she neared the garden department she fondly thought of as mecca. She simply couldn’t resist the 10 cent herb seed collection and the assortment of bulbs on display. She felt herself magnetically drawn to a shelf of already-blooming Cyclamen. Red! Pink! White! Oh, they were so lovely; each one more beautimous than the last. A certain corner of her dining room needed a splash of color and she knew the price was right: $3.50, marked down from $7.88. Wanting to live a pilot’s lifestyle on a flight attendant’s salary, she knew she had to pace herself. It was, after all, just starting to warm up. Gardening season was barely upon her on this blustery March day. She chose a red specimen (her favorite color) and nestled it among her other various impulse buys. She proceeded to the self-scanning register. Much to her surprise, the perfect red Cyclamen rang up as .02, not $7.88, the original price. Not $3.50, as her 4-days-before scan had revealed. Just two cents! She fumbled for her cell phone to call the Head Weed. She just knew she would win the “best garden bargain EVER” award with this major coup! What would get her friend Cindy away from her mundane work faster than a two cent sale on Cyclamen at Wal-mart? And she was right. The Head Weed instructed her to buy every one in sight! Being the dutiful little Weedette that she was, she did as instructed. She ran back and filled her cart with all 15 plants. Total expenditure: 30 cents plus tax! She agreed to meet the Head Weed in the Target parking lot to share the loot and collect her 20 cents. Don’t believe this story? We have photographic proof and a partial receipt.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

cyclamentwocents.jpg





First blooms of the season…

5 03 2008

My Hellebores are blooming! This one appeared to be lifting its head to the sunlight, raised up by a jumble of leaves and unopened blooms below it (Hellebore blooms nod or face downward). The plants in my front yard garden were given to me by my friend Karen and they have steadily spread into several clumps over the past few years. They begin to bloom right before my yellow crocuses appear. Some of the blooms are a creamy white while the others are pink like this one. I think the pink one is a “Sunshine Strain.” A “strain” is an unflowered seedling of a particular set of parents. In Hellebores, most strains usually resemble the better qualities of their parents (much like humans, I suppose!). There aren’t many subjects in bloom right now, but it sure feels good to photograph something in the garden again.

© Cindy Dyer. All rights reserved.

hellebore-1.jpg